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Iron. One of the most common elements in the world, and a necessary mineral in the human diet. It is also abundant in much of our water supply, and while a necessary nutrient, can create problems in your home and business when present in the water you use. There are a few telltale signs that you might have too much iron in your water and need an iron filter.  Rust stains on plumbing fixtures, including toilets, sinks, and bathtubs. Rust colored stains on clothes which have been washed. Marks on floors or walls washed with water that may be confused with water stains. Metallic taste in water or water-based beverages like coffee or tea. ...
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Have you wondered how to detect and test for contaminants in your water? Has arsenic been reported in your community’s well water? It’s time for a lesson on arsenic.  Arsenic is a naturally occurring element, and is found in soil, rocks and minerals (1). Arsenic can enter the environment and ground water in a variety of ways – some natural and some unnatural. Arsenic is naturally released into the atmosphere due to erosion of natural deposits (2). It can also be released from farming, industrial and manufacturing processes (1) such as runoffs from orchards, fertilizers, mining, coal burning and electronics manufacturing (2). There are negative health effects ...
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Did you know that water can vary by neighborhood, city and state? The water entering an apartment in New York City can be very different than the water in rural Washington State. Geography plays a major part in water quality. It can be a tricky thing. That’s why so many people rely on a local water expert – the Culligan Man.  This fall we’ve been talking a lot about problem water and contaminants. No one contaminant is alike and each one affects cities, states and regions differently. Nitrates in water is a perfect example. Nitrates are a potential contaminant in ground water originating from nitrogen, a plant nutrient present in inorganic fertilizers ...
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Water quality, particularly well water, is sometimes affected by natural, organic sources. Does your water have a bitter taste or a musty odor? Is it yellow in color? If this describes your water, tannins may be the culprit. Tannins are natural substances which come from plants or soil. When tannins are present in household and drinking water they may cause issues related to taste, color and odor of water*. Your well water may have tannins in it if you notice: Water is yellow or tea colored  Water has a musty or earthy odor  Drinking water has a bitter or tart taste  Laundry is discolored and doesn't smell fresh  Yellow stains on ...
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Rotten egg odor is one of the most common and unpleasant effects of  hydrogen sulfide , or H2S, in your water. The presence of hydrogen sulfide doesn't just smell bad, it may also tarnish your silver or corrode your plumbing and fixtures. This infographic from Culligan will help you understand how hydrogen sulfide gas gets into water. It also begins to explain how Culligan may help reduce the presence of this contaminant, and cut down on the smell of rotten eggs in your water. We think that is a good thing. Click  here  to view the full infographic! *Hydrogen sulfide and other contaminants and impurities are not necessarily in your water
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You may not be able to recognize  Total Dissolved Solids , or TDS, with the naked eye, but you may see its effects all over your home or business. TDS in water can cause a bitter, metallic taste in your drinking water, corrode your plumbing fixtures and shorten the life of your appliances. This new infographic from Culligan shows you how TDS can get into your water and how it can cause unsightly side effects. Culligan also provides water treatment suggestions to reduce the presence of TDS in your water. We know you want the best quality water - that's what we want, too. If you think you have TDS in your water,  request a water test  from your local ...
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Arsenic is sneaky. You can’t see it. You can’t taste it. But if high levels of arsenic reside in your water, it may cause both short and long term detrimental health effects to you and your family (1). Arsenic  is a naturally occurring semi-metal element found in rocks, soil, water, plants, and even animals (2). It is more prevalent in ground water sources like wells rather than lakes and rivers (2). What compounds the levels of arsenic in ground water are things like industrial, manufacturing, and agricultural runoff (2). Industrial gases, paints, insecticides and herbicides, and burned fossil fuels can all increase the level of arsenic in the well ...
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Rust stains in your tub or sink? Water taste metallic? Do you get enough of your iron in your multivitamins? Learn more about how iron gets in your water and how a water filter system can help the associated impact on your home. Check out the first  infographic  in the  Problem Water Series  to learn the ins and outs on iron. We want to hear from you! Does this help you understand the impact of iron on your water and home? What other well or municipal water issues can we cover in future infographics? *Iron, contaminants and impurities are not necessarily in your water
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Pumping iron?

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Is your water pumping iron? Are your fixtures and surfaces  Fe eling the ef Fe cts of  Fe ? If your home or business is dealing with high levels of iron in its water supply, the byproduct of contamination can be far-reaching and should be dealt with quickly and thoroughly. What is it? Fe, better known as iron for those who forgot high school chemistry as quickly as they learned it, is in anything but short supply. As an element, it is actually the fourth most abundant resource on earth and can be found in sediment, soil and water. Iron conjures up two distinct associations for most people: metal and meat. Most people would be mostly correct. ...
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The Usual Suspects: Iron

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As we discussed in a previous blog post, iron can be more than a hassle in the home. Its effects range from a metallic taste in drinking water to ruined pipes and appliances. Anyway you look at it, too much Fe = bad news. Not all iron is created equal though. Some forms of the element are more damaging than others, or more prevalent in private well water in certain geographic situations. With that said, each and every variation of iron needs a unique filtration solution to help counteract its effects. Together, the multiple forms of iron make up a formidable crew of waterborne contaminants bent on ruining your day. Mr. Popular Dissolved or ferrous ...
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If iron and its cohorts are personified as a gang, consider arsenic a ninja. Tasteless. Odorless. Damaging. Arsenic may sound like the poison of choice for a sinister James Bond-type villain, but it should also be of concern for private well water owners. In fact, the James Bond analogy is not that far off given the consequences of excessive arsenic contamination. The  Natural Resources Defenses Council  (NRDC) lists multiple forms of cancer and skin damage among the very worst effects of prolonged exposure to incredibly high levels of arsenic. As a contaminant, it can occur naturally in soil and plants, or be found in industrial applications. ...
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Hard water may not sound as ominous as iron, or as formidable as  arsenic . But your hair, skin, plumbing and appliances may not exactly agree with that assessment. In fact, almost anything that uses water on a regular basis can suffer if hard water is in the equation, and that is an all too common headache for well water users. For water to be considered hard, it must have a high volume of "hard" minerals, including calcium and magnesium. The level of hardness is measured in grains per gallon (gpg) or milligrams per liter (mg/L). Water that registers between 0-1 gpg is considered soft; moderately hard water reads at 3.5-7 gpg; and any water ...
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We're in the thick of summertime - sunshine, hot weather, swimming pools. You can probably smell the chlorine wafting from your glass of drinking water. Wait. That's not right. You should be smelling chlorine in your pool, not your drinking water. So what gives? Here's a little known fact: did you know chlorine has been widely used as a disinfectant for drinking water since the early 1900s? Chlorine didn't just revolutionize water purification, though. It has been hailed as  the   major public health achievement  of the 20th century! Today, chlorine remains the most widely used chemical for water disinfection to  ward off waterborne diseases ...
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Total dissolved solids. Have you heard the reference? Those of us in the know refer to them as TDS. Much easier to remember, isn't it? But what are they, and why should you be concerned if there is a high level of TDS in your drinking water? TDS most commonly refers to the level of dissolved ions in water. Simply put,  TDS is the presence of dissolved minerals in your water , most often calcium, potassium and sodium. You see now where the name comes from? Let's get down to the science of it. Pure water doesn't conduct electricity very well, but ions dissolved in the water will. The more ions dissolved in water, the higher the conductivity, which is where ...
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Ask any Culligan Man why a water softener is right for you, and he’ll explain why it’s not only right for you, but also for your home. He is the expert, after all. Your Culligan water dealer is intimately familiar with the type, hardness and any special characteristics of local water conditions in your community, in order to understand which water treatment solutions work best. When it comes to protecting your home and its water-using appliances, the best defense is a water softener. The Water Quality Association ( WQA ) agrees. In fact, a study in 2009 confirmed it. “Water softeners can rightfully be positioned as one of the very highest energy-saving ...
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Chances are you’re not a scientist. Thankfully you don’t have to be to determine what may be ailing the water in your home. Of course, you can just call your Culligan Man for a  free water test , and not only get an answer, but also a personalized solution. However, we understand there’s a certain satisfaction in coming to a conclusion on your own. Before you can make a determination on whether your water is compromised, you’ll need a few scientific instruments – your senses. That’s right. Sight, taste, smell and touch can sometimes help you determine if there are contaminants in your water. Pretty simple! But don’t be fooled. While water contamination ...
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The answer is: not necessarily. It is not uncommon for people to drink tap water laced with 20 or 30 chemical contaminants. The pollutants derive from a wealth of sources, including agriculture, factory discharges, consumer products, urban runoff and wastewater treatment plants. In fact, over 300,000 groundwater sites in the U.S. are contaminated. The simple (or perhaps complicated) truth is that there are contaminants in our water that our natural senses cannot detect. They may go unnoticed by sight or smell, however they can impair bodily functions in our eyesight, livers and kidneys and cause other serious health risks such as gastrointestinal illness, ...
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The single best way to know what's in your water is to be your own best resource. We want to help you do just that by providing tools and information to help you make smart choices about your water. There are a lot of things you can do to find out if you have  problem water , the causes behind it, and what options you have for addressing it. Diagnose Problem Water The signs that point to problems in your water are often the most obvious, but key factors to be aware of are: Appearance : Water is cloudy or discolored. Common in many states and municipalities, you can  explore water problems by state  to see if the water where you live is ...
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When the word comes out that your area has been affected by a boil order, it's time to take stock of affected water and manage its reach in your home. Any place in your home that uses water is affected, from the kitchen to the laundry room. Start by following these guidelines to avoid contact with contaminated water. Stay Safe from Contaminated Water Don't drink the water, prepare food, brush your teeth, or use any materials that have been in contact with water.  Throw out ice cubes, coffee, tea, and any stored beverages made or used with your home's water. Turn off water or block access to refrigerator water dispensers and faucets to ...
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We probably all have a general sense of what water should look, smell, taste, and feel like, but sometimes it's not always obvious when there's something wrong with your water. Self-Diagnosing Problem Water While some contaminants are better at hiding than others, there are a few telltale signs that something is causing a problem with your water. Odor : If something smells suspicious, it probably is. Common pause-giving smells you might come across in tap water include: The Pool Smell : Easily identifiable from our associations with swimming pools, high chlorine levels in water are usually to blame for this olfactory affront.  Something's ...
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